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 Contact Info

Northwest Conservation District

Torrington office:
1185 New Litchfield St
Torrington, CT 06790

Phone: 860-626-7222

ncd@conservect.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut Envirothon

CT Envirothon Aquatics Workshop Agenda

February 9, 2013, Goodwin College
 
8:10- 8:40 Team Registration
(Breakfast Items Available)
 
8:40-8:50 Intro & Explanation of Activities for the Day
(Kimberly Bradley)
 
8:50- 9:15 Intro & Description of Science programs at Goodwin College
(Bruce Morton)
9:20 -1:20 Workshops
Time
 
 
 
 
 
9:20- 10:15
Denise Savageau
Non Point Source Pollution
Laura Saucier
CTDEEP
Freshwater Mussels of CT
Greg Watkins-Colwell
Yale University
Amphibians of CT
Greg Bugbee & Jordan Gibbons
CAES
Aquatic Invasive Plants
TBD
Wetland Habitat Management and Restoration
10:20-11:15
Denise Savageau
Non Point Source Pollution
Laura Saucier
CTDEEP
Freshwater Mussels of CT
Greg Watkins-Colwell
Yale University
Amphibians of CT
Greg Bugbee & Jordan Gibbons
CAES
Aquatic Invasive Plants
TBD
Wetland Habitat Management and Restoration
11:15-11:25
10 minute break
10 minute break
10 minute break
10 minute break
10 Minute break
11:25-12:20
Jack Clausen
UCONN
Watershed Terminology & Resources
Meghan Ruta
CT DEEP
Freshwater Inverts
Jose Pereira
NOAA NMFS
Fresh and Salt Fishes of CT
Project Oceanology
Saltwater Inverts
Kim Bradley GEI Consultants & Meghan Twohig
Aquatic Sampling Techniques
12:25-1:20
Jack Clausen
UCONN
Watershed Terminology & Resources
Meghan Ruta
CT DEEP
Freshwater Inverts
Jose Pereira
NOAA NMFS
Fresh and Salt Fishes of CT
Project Oceanology
Saltwater Inverts
Kim Bradley GEI Consultants & Meghan Twohig
Aquatic Sampling Techniques
1:20-1:25
Workshop Evals
Workshop Evals
Workshop Evals
Workshop Evals
 
Workshop Evals
 

 The 2012 Envirothon was held at Winding Trails in Farmington, CT.  Congratulations to all the Teams that participated!

1st Place- Housatonic Valley Agriscience

Read article here

 

2nd Place-  Litchfield High School                                          3rd Place- Housatonic Valley Regional High School

                                                                     

The Connecticut Envirothon is a natural resource based education program started in 1992 by the state's Soil and Water Conservation Districts. This high school level program promotes environmental awareness, knowledge, and stewardship through education and team competition.

Throughout the year Envirothon teams work with a teacher/advisor on curriculum materials in the study areas of Soils, Aquatics, Wildlife, Forestry and Current Environmental Issues.

Then in May, teams meet for a day-long, fun filled field competition. Teams work together on practical, environmental problem solving and hands-on challenges. In addition, each team prepares a short oral presentation on a real life environmental problem and presents it to a panel of experts.

The winning Envirothon team earns the chance to represent our state at the Canon Envirothon, a weeklong summertime event. This years team will travel to Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada July 24- July 29 for the National Competition. The Connecticut team competes for scholarships and other prizes against about 60 other teams from the USA and Canada.

Visit the Connecticut Envirothon website  and “Take the Natural Challenge.”

Planning

The mission of the Northwest Conservation District is to promote the conservation and wise use of local natural resources through education and technical services. The NCD service area encompasses thirty-four municipalities covering approximately 1208 square miles.
Northwest Connecticut has seen a significant increase in the pace of development and the size and sophistication of the projects proposed creating concern among local citizens and elected officials. While it is true that current economic conditions have put many projects on hold, this pause is only temporary.
 
On the other hand, there is a growing grass roots movement to preserve the sense of place often described as rural character with working farms, scenic vistas, forested ridgelines and special places. Volunteers serving on local commissions, land trusts, watershed groups have devoted time and talent to efforts such as Natural Resource Inventories and have advocated for better planning.
 
Facing these conflicting pressures are the land use commissioners in each town and the often very part time land use staff. In many cases they rely on outdated regulations. Most towns have no planner and sometimes feel powerless in the face of techniques such as affordable housing. Pressures to increase municipal tax revenues have led to the approval of projects ill-suited to the landscape and at odds with community character. Community goals and vision as expressed in Plans of Conservation and Development are often not being translated into actual community growth patterns. In addition, the regional planning entities (COGS, CEO or RPA) are severely underfunded. State Planning Resources available to towns are almost non existent. 
 
We believe the future will bring substantial changes to the NCD service area even with the current downturn in the housing market. These changes require new focus to our mission and efforts. We have identified a critical need for Conservation Planning and Implementation in our service area. Development will come and it will be impossible to purchase all the threatened open space or preserve all the farmland. The question is HOW WILL THE REGION GROW? What tools do the towns in the Northwest Corner need NOW in order to plan for growth, manage and control growth and insure the results will carry out their stated goals? NCD is working in partnership with the recently formed regional collaborative, regional planning groups and municipalities to assemble the best available procedures, techniques and regulations to guide land development. Using these tools, towns will have the ability to direct market forces toward structured conservation techniques resulting in far better growth patterns.  
 
Among the several environmental groups working in the area, NCD possesses a unique combination of capabilities and services. Because of our long partnership working in the trenches with our towns filling the gaps in state or regional services, we are seen as the “Go To Group” for environmental solutions. Because NCD is a trusted independent voice, recognized and respected for environmental problem solving, we are well suited to educate and encourage better conservation planning and to serve as a catalyst for needed changes.

 

 

 

Northwest Conservation District Newsletter

The NCD publishes the "Voice of Local Conservation" every fall and spring.  The newsletter contains useful information about local environmental news, events such as the Earth Day Plant Sale and trout stocking, and workshops being offered.  

CURRENT: Spring 2014 Newsletter

Fall 2013 Newsletter  

Spring 2013 Newsletter  

To receive our newsletter and/or make changes to your mailing address please call 860-626-7222.

If you prefer to recieve our newsletter via email, please join our mailing list on the Northwest Conservation District Home Page.

(UNDER CONSTRUCTION: Mailing address form coming soon. )

 

Backyard Conservation

Bringing conservation from the countryside to your backyard—Just as they do on the farm, conservation practices on non-agricultural land can help increase food and shelter for birds and other wildlife, control soil erosion, reduce sediment in waterways, conserve water and improve water quality, inspire a stewardship ethic, and beautify the landscape.

"Backyard Conservation" shows you how conservation practices that are used on agricultural land across the country to conserve and improve natural resources can be adapted for use on the land around your home. These practices help the environment and can make your yard more attractive and enjoyable.

The following tip sheets offer "how to" steps and helpful hints on backyard conservation practices.  Web page (HTML) versions of the PDF files are available on the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) website

 

 Resource Center

Visit our office for a wide range of environmental and conservation resource materials.

Books

Journals

Pamphlets

Fact Sheets

Special set of resources for municipal land use commissioners

Videos

Topo Maps

And much much more are available

Most of theseare free or available on loan. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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